Artificial Heart 2: Proceedings of the 2nd International by Tetsuzo Akutsu, Hitoshi Koyanagi, Setsuo Takatani, Kazunori

By Tetsuzo Akutsu, Hitoshi Koyanagi, Setsuo Takatani, Kazunori Kataoka, Jack G. Copeland, Stuart L. Cooper, Peer M. Portner, David B. Geselowitz

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Extra info for Artificial Heart 2: Proceedings of the 2nd International Symposium on Artificial Heart and Assist Device, August 13–14, 1987, Tokyo, Japan

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00 x 108 cells/cm3 To clarify the role of platelets in thrombosis, we added sodium azide to the recalcified PRP in the in vitro column experiment . Sodium azide is known to be an inhibitor of the energy metabolism of platelets. Upon adding sodium azide to the PRP , neither depression of platelet elution nor thrombosis was observed (Fig. 3). This result indicates that platelets undergo a sequence of activation processes due to changes in their energy metabolism , resulting in thrombosis. 2 is considered to be due to suppression of the activation process of adsorbed platelets rather than merely reducing the physicochemical adsorption of platelets on the surface .

To improve nonthrombogenicity of the heparinized surfaces, therefore, it is necessary to establish a method not only of maintaining the bioactivity of immobilized heparin but also of preventing heparin-induced platelet activation and aggregation. This paper describes the development of heparinimmobilized segmented polyurethaneurea surfaces using hydrophilic, long polyethylene oxide (PEO) chains as spacers. Previously described highly dynamic motions of PEO spacers at blood-material interfaces [4, 5) are expected to contribute to an increase in heparin bioactivity and a reduction in platelet adhesion.

Polymer 26: 978-986 . c (1976) In vivo degradation of silicone rubber poppets m prosthetic heart valves. J Biomed Mat ~es 10: 471-481 Phau SK, Castillo E, Anderson JM, Hlltner A (1987) Biodegradation of a polyurethane in vitro. J Biomed Mat Res 21: 231-246 Discussion Cooper (University of Wisconsin): The degradation of segmented polyurethaneureas with a polyethyleneglycol soft segment in a biological environment may caused by two factors, such as oxidation by peroxides and hydrolysis by hydrolytic enzymes.

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